MICHAEL WEINHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY
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Mornings

 
SO MANY OTHER THINGS MORNINGS

Dr Deborah Williams, Brudine co-owner, reviews the scheduled consultations that will start at 8:00am. Williams bought Brudine in 2005 from original owners and her employers, Bruce and Geraldine Fuller, who had opened the practice in 1976. As a single mum of 3 children who was also renting the house above the small suburban practice in Melba, Williams took a risk to make a better future for herself and her family. As she said of the time, “to earn anything, to even earn up to what a teacher was making, you had to own a practice.” With subsequent growth over the next several years, Williams hired Dr Karen Viggers (2005) and Dr Fiona Starr (2012). Starr became a co-owner in 2015 before the practice moved to a purpose-built facility in the neighbouring suburb of Charnwood.
20 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Louise Dobson, as a regular, knows most of the staff well and likes to have a chat and joke about how much her pets are costing her. But she's one of many owners who deeply loves their pets and will go the extra mile for them, rather than not caring enough. Receptionists Kelly Haslop (left) and Sorrel Nation. TODO: which dog? what?
16 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Nurse Skye Longley comes in during Brudine's post-Christmas shutdown to feed the two office Cats, Bailey and XXX, and a stray black kitten that has been in since early-December and which the practice is looking after until it can find an owner for it.
27 December, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Shar Peis were generally dogs to be considered "handle with care". The Shar Pei breed was originally used as a guard dog because of its suspicious nature. While they are loyal and loving to family, they can be aggressive and territorial without proper socialisation or training. And they can take their time to warm up to people they don't know.
2 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Nurse Chelsea Rose does a basic examination on Lucy being admitted for day surgery (de-sexing).
22 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Kensie, a Shar Pei, has "Shar Pei Fever". One symptom can be amyloidosis, a build up of the amyloid protein in the kidneys. There is no cure but blood tests are taken regularly and the drug, Colchicine, which is prescribed for Kensie, is used to reduce the frequency and intensity of amyloid protein build up.
20 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Charlie Webb examines Gorgeous George whose owner, Deric Kenyon, had brought in after suffering from vomiting, diarrhoea and weight-loss for a few days.
1 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Gorgeous George ideally should have faecal tests done, it should have had blood tests done, potentially some sort of gut biopsies with an endoscope or an ex-lap [exploratory laparotomy] would have been better to take samples to send away, and potentially imaging.

We’re talking several thousand dollars and that guy [Deric Kenyon] is a pensioner, and he can’t afford that.
— Dr Charlie Webb

Dr Charlie Webb treats Gorgeous George's symptoms conservatively; waiting a few days to see of the vomiting and diarrhea stop and if weight loss continues. Gorgeous George made a full recovery.
1 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

You get a range of reasons as to why finances are constrained, and that can be anything from being on the pension through to sudden major expenditures in the family or it can just be because they have other things happening within the family that mean that that’s [pet care/finance] not on their priority list.
— Dr Gwen Shirlow
A lot of new grads I’ve worked with over the years, it’s becoming drilled into them that “You have to do gold standard, you have to do as the book says or why bother”. But that’s not the case, that’s not the real world, and there are often things you can do…you push for gold standard but if that’s not within the owner’s ability to afford it, it doesn’t mean you have to go for euthanasia. There are compromises that can be found that mean the animal gets treatment that is effective within those financial constraints … Equally, you don’t want to compromise … It’s quite a fine balance and quite a hard line to walk down sometimes. It’s got to be professionally appropriate and medically or surgically appropriate but unfortunately you do have to take in finances into account because not everyone can afford that gold level.
— Dr Gwen Shirlow

Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson configures the chemistry analyser to run a blood test.
14 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

I really like the lab part, taking bloods and putting drips on and that kind of stuff. I always thought surgery would be my favourite part of it but I much prefer taking bloods and running them and working out what’s wrong with the animal. I guess I get that from Mum; Mum was a phlebotomist.
— Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson

Dr Charlie Webb (left), Nurse Georgia [TODO: last name] (middle), and Nurse Chelsea Rose collect blood samples for pathology [TODO: FIV? why did it come in, who was it?]. Nurse Georgia constrains the cat for its own safety while Rose taps its head to keep it occupied, collectively preventing the cat from sudden movements that may cause itself injury.
15 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson uses an unorthodox but effective technique for mixing a bag of IV fluids with a combination of Morphine, Lignocaine and Ketamine (aka "MLK"). The cocktail will be given to a dog, Turbo, with a very painful spiral fracture of his femur that will be repaired later in the day with an invasive orthopaedic surgery later in the day.
16 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

I’m not really a sit-down desky kind of person. I’d be bored out of my brains; I’m a physical person.
— Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson

Nurse Kelsey Savage itemises and stocks the weekly delivery of practice consumables, including prescription food.
20 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

After a long-time client's pet dog - well-known to the practice - was sadly euthanised, staff took paw prints to send to the owner as a keepsake. It seems difficult to know how to participate in the grieving process, as it differs from person to person, family to family. However, the main aim of the practice staff is to provide a dignified and gentle euthanasia experience for both pets and owners. And, sometimes, sending paw prints seems to be appropriate and is always appreciated.
2 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Euthanasias are difficult but I think it’s one of the most important part of my job to try and make that as smooth and peaceful as possible. … There are clients that I’ve known for years and I’m really glad that I can be there to guide them through that final act and try and make it smooth for them. And because they know me [they can have] someone they know in that situation. I will even come in on days that I’m not there to do something like that.
— Dr Karen Viggers
[The hardest thing is] Seeing people lose their animals. Knowing that there’s nothing more you can do to help. Knowing that these owners are going to go home now to an empty house.
— Nurse Kelsey Savage

Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson adds a dog to the board along with the tests and/or surgeries it is having today.
14 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

At 10, we’d trap rabbits [on the family farm] and I was allowed to dissect them, take all the organs out, lay them all out, label them, and then try and put them back in. I just wanted to know what was on the inside. … I was interested in what was on the inside of bodies and I had parents [Mum a science teacher and Dad a biologist] who were interested in fostering that.

I had no life plan other than being a vet.
— Dr Louise Grey

It's too early in the moorning for dental work.
3 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

A rabbit – it’s going to live for 10 years and hop around your house like a vegetarian cat. People care about them – like birds can live for 80 years, you’re going to get attached, so it’s nice to be able to care about them.
— Dr Louise Grey
I don’t see the people who view their $20 rabbit as a disposable pet … because they’re not going to pay what’s needed, they’re just going to put it down and get another pet.
— Dr Louise Grey
What I like about GP [GP-style vetting] is I get to know my decrepit, ancient rabbits when treating them for 5 years and I get to know their families.
— Dr Louise Grey

Dr Louise Grey examines Peanut, an Conure parrot belonging to Marie Stove. [TODO: what was peanut in for?]. As part of the examination, Grey gathers Peanut's history both verbally from Stove and visually via photographs that Stove has taken. Mobile devices are used quite a bit by on-the-ball owners to record the symptoms that are worrying them.
20 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson admits Oliver for scheduled orthopaedic surgery later in the day. [TODO: specifically what? luxation?], and relates the process to owner, Xarlene Castro. Admission as an opportunity to articulate what will and might happen to someone's pet, and to comfort owners with that information.
9 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

I like to know that those owners are really happy with what’s going to happen with their animal that day. I like to know that they are confident that we are going to do what they have come in for ... and they know that we are going to look after them.
— Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson

Kay Blemings (left), with Daniella Cecere and her 6 month old Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Daisie, waiting to be admitted for Daisie's de-sexing surgery.
6 April, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Jess Winsall, in her second week of practice after graduating, surveys the hospital board during the tail end of rounds.
14 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

There’s a lot more staff here, so it’s more chilled. And the staff here are so friendly and willing to look after each other.
— Nurse Julie Marten
Brudine is much more like the type of practice that was common when I graduated, and is becoming less common – the privately-owned, working together as a close team, sort of business.
— Dr Louise Grey

Assigning surgeons to surgeries.
14 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Trainee Nurse Claire Goodlock tackles the endless laundry work that comes with veterinary nursing.
9 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

The perils of the job.
9 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Gwen Shirlow scrubs in.
12 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson avoids x-ray scatter completely by standing outside the x-ray room. Whoever has to be with the animal wears lead-lined gowns to prevent exposure particularly to the thyroid.
16 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Jess Winsall (left) and Nurse Julie Marten anaesthetise a cat through inhalation of isoflurane via a small animal induction chamber; sometimes used for knocking out unfriendly cats.
26 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Difference with vet nursing, as compared to say lab work or zookeeping, is that it is different every day and that keeps it interesting. I do like a little bit of routine but I don’t like it being monotonous. I like that things are changing.
— Nurse Julie Marten

Besides stopping female dogs and cats from falling pregnant, speying greatly reduces the chances of pyrometra (infection of the uterus) and breast cancer.
12 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Nurse Chelsea Rose and Nurse Kelsey Savage prep a dog for surgery.
7 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

[On clients’ comments at the practice’s open day]

They all said more-or-less the same thing to me...

‘I didn’t realise you had this many staff.’

‘I didn’t realise how much you guys do out the back here,’ the majority of which is done by the nurses and by the support staff to the vets.

‘I didn’t know the nurses were capable of doing all this stuff that they do.’
— Practice Manager Bri Smith

Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson teachers Trainee Nurse Claire Goodlock.
6 April, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Nurse Chelsea Rose prepares to take paw prints of a recently euthanised dog.
6 July, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

The paw prints will be sent with a card to the deceased animal's owners.
6 July, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Jess Winsall performs a de-sexing surgery.
15 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Grace Butler (left) is consoled by Nurse Skye Longley after a euthanasia for an owner who was deeply upset.
6 July, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

There are some cases where it’s shit, and you don’t want to do it, and you do get upset. I think that’s dependent on your client and their situation.
— Dr Grace Butler

There are seasonal procedures too; grass seeds during spring and summer, for example. Grass seeds are nature's "slow bullets", capable of piercing skin, tracking through the inside of the body and penetrating organs. They can be fatal. [TODO: Dog's Name.]
20 December, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

I think you can float between cases as long as you’re work is done and your animals are OK, you can definitely go and hang around and see a really amazing surgery while all the other vets are like, ‘Yeah, we really want to see it but we have consults to do.’
— Nurse Skye Longley
 Practice Manager Bri Smith (left) and Dr Deborah Williams (middle) have an administrative meeting at Dr Fiona Starr's house. It's Starr's day off. Starr and Williams are the practice co-owners. Smith, Williams' daughter, grew up in the practice as a young girl, before becoming a receptionist and, ultimately the practice manager.  28 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Practice Manager Bri Smith (left) and Dr Deborah Williams (middle) have an administrative meeting at Dr Fiona Starr's house. It's Starr's day off. Starr and Williams are the practice co-owners. Smith, Williams' daughter, grew up in the practice as a young girl, before becoming a receptionist and, ultimately the practice manager.
28 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Gwen Shirlow calls an owner following a [TODO: surgery or test results, i think it was the latter but check.].
20 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Before becoming Dr Deborah William's co-owner, Dr Fiona Starr was hired by Williams to fill a surgical need at the practice.
7 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Nurse Ana Manuolevao (right) brings her one month old son, Laulelei, to the practice to introduce him to staff. She is on maternity leave and will come back to her old job in August, 2018. Brudine is very supportive of and flexible around staff having or raising children. Dr Deborah Williams (left) was a single mother who faced challenges raising her own children, including now practice manager Bri Smith (middle), and her experiences have influenced the practice's approach to support for parenting. It's also pragmatics: there are 4 times as many women as men in veterinary services in Australia and Brudine's 25 staff are all female other than Dr Charlie Webb.
12 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

What are you going to do, not hire females anymore? Then we wouldn’t have a business. We have enough trouble getting vets now.
— Dr Deborah Williams

Practice Manager Bri Smith, and Billy, prefers working in a dimly lit office.
5 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Depending on the practice, veterinary nurses might be anything from glorified kennel hands to very involved in a lot of the more clinical aspects.
27 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Louise Grey examines Grizzly Bear in Brudine's custom exotic animal wing. The wing is separate for a number of reasons mostly to do with animal; smaller animals are often prey and removing scents that smell like predators (dogs, cats) can increase comfort for them, and ultimately make it easier to treat them.
6 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Fiona Starr expresses an infected anal gland.
10 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

I still believe it kind of has this idea – probably like a vet as well – that you get to spend a lot of fun time with animals, which you do, but there’s also a lot of hard work and also a lot of shit work in there as well. There’s a lot of cleaning, not just of animals or animal cages or the practice, stocking, lots of mundane work.
— Nurse Skye Longley

Nurse Skye Longley finishes up expressing an infected anal gland.
10 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Deborah Williams (left), industry veteran, and Dr Grace Butler, newly graduated from Charles Sturt University.
12 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Almost everyone in the practice has a pet, if not several. Nurse Skye Longley (left), has Wean, who has a 10% chance of surviving what is most likely sepsis.
16 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Fiona Starr palpates Annabelle who was brought in by her owner, Linda Parchi (right), and Linda's neighbour, Chris Foley, who helped Parchi bring Annabelle to he practice. Annabelle had been anaerexic for three days, was vomiting froth and had blood in her diarrhoea. She could possibly have been suffering a pancreatic episode, as she was prone to pancreatitis. She stayed in hospital overnight on fluids, and was prescribed metronidazole and amoxycillin. Annabelle made a full recovery..
19 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT. 

More and more people have pets and love them more as a support tool. … At university, they are teaching young ones in vet science to do what you can and then send them to specialist. The drift to the GP/Specialisation model is going to make it really expensive for people. … For me the vet industry going in that direction is going to make it hard for that little old lady, the pensioner. And that’s not going to be good. I can’t see that being good for the whole of society. How are they going to get best vet care, or any vet care if they can’t afford it.
— Dr Deborah Williams

Bill Frost with Budgie, coming in to determine whether or not she has the same virus that her partner, Ziggy, died of just over a week ago.
9 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Fiona Starr (Brudine Co-Owner) takes Jordie's temperature. Pretty much every examination with a dog or a cat includes taking the temperature rectally. [TODO: why rectally vs ear or axillary?].
20 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

They don’t tell you in vet school that you spend 90% of your time with your finger up a dog’s bum, and the other 10% injecting them with needles.
— Dr Louise Grey

Alex Swalling is in with Dr Gwen Shirlow to get a [TODO: approval?] for his dog, Bailey. Bailey suffers from a neurosis that means he is nervy, very protective of his master and consequently prone to biting. The introduction of another dog into Swalling's family has exacerbated Bailey's condition and put him in the position where he has to give up his dog to protect his children. Bailey's condition is not bad enough that he needs to be euthanised but medication hasn't worked; fortunately, the RSPCA have agreed to take Bailey in and attempt some rehab and try to find Bailey a new home.
27 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Intubating with and endotracheal tube. Dr Gwen Shirlow (right) and Nurse Julie Marten.
14 December, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Weighing a Conure.
23 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Charlie Webb opens up Daisie's abdomen before completing the [TODO ovariohysterectomy or ovariectomy].
6 April, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Trainee Nurse Claire Goodlock (right) watches as Dr Fiona Starr operate.
26 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Arianne Lowe with Lily, one of the animals cared for at the Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve.
5 July, 2018. Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve. Tidbinbilla, ACT.

It’s real soul food for me. The work [at the Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve] is very different, it’s at a different pace because you’re looking at larger scale, … like population management, like 60 wallabies and what’s happening with their feeding regime, their nutrition. I do a lot of nutrition review. Then there’s some clinical work and there’s the endangered wallabies that are managed at the individual level, really closely.
— Dr Arianne Lowe

Jordie, belonging to Sarah Hausner, keeps staff (TODO left, Dr Fiona Starr middle and Rebekah Morton right) entertained.
20 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Castrating a male dog or cat prevent s testicular cancer and some prostate problems.
16 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Gwen Shirlow, recently returned from being quite sick, rests before deciding to go home early.
31 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Practice Manager Bri Smith (left) and Head Nurse Stephanie Robertson try to wrangle 25 full-time, part-time and casual staff into a roster.
31 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Charlie Webb reviews the 30+ cm rod he inserted into Turbo's tibia to support the bone as it repairs after a significant spiral fracture.
16 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Isoflurane anaesthetic is delivered to Bear the ferret to knock it out before an x-ray. Ferrets are always on the go and often prone to biting.
27 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

 
SO MANY OTHER THINGS MORNINGS