MICHAEL WEINHARDT PHOTOGRAPHY
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Weekends

SO MANY OTHER THINGS is an long-form photo-essay about what it means to work in a suburban small/exotic animal veterinary practice, from the rewarding to the risks and the challenges.

 
SO MANY OTHER THINGS WEEKENDS

Urine and mornings in veterinary practices seem to go hand-in-hand. After staying overnight to recover from invasive orthopaedic surgery, Turbo is about to be taken to the toilet but will have difficulty urinating. To prevent bladder infection, Dr Louise Grey and Nurse Skye Longley catheterise Turbo and manually extract the urine.
17 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

I think the problem with vet nursing, and probably what I find the hardest with it, is that there’s no money in it, and there’s no growth in it. So, there’s no ability to better yourself; there’s definitely a lot of courses out there for you to learn things but it’s not necessarily like you’re going up a chain [career path]. There’s just no growth within the industry itself, for a vet nurse anyway. After two years of doing it, I loved it and I wished I could do it for the rest of my life. But, it’s a very physically demanding job as well, and doing at 60 wasn’t going to be something I was able to do.
— Nurse Skye Longley

Dr Jess Winsall and her dog, Narla. Winsall is renting in a place that is having house inspections for possible selling so needed to bring her dog in to work.
24 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Arianne Lowe in consultation with Mr Tickles, and Ecclectus parrot, and owner Elise de Rota. [TODO: what was Mr Tickles in for?]
24 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

It’s different and sometimes I find contrast refreshing, which is why I love the exotics, because I love that I go from a little tiny budgie who’s sneezing to a puppy that’s bouncing all over you!
— Dr Arianne Miller

Dr Charlie Webb.
3 March, 2018. Webb Equine Veterinary Services. Weston, ACT.

Dr Fiona Starr.
23 December, 2017. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Dr Arianne Lowe (left) followed Dr Louise Grey to Brudine. Grey left the practice that both her and Lowe worked at to go to Brudine, who were setting up a specialty exotic animal wing. Lowe, who also has a passion for pets less common than cats and dogs, decided to move as well.
6 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Laundry at a veterinary practice never stops.
13 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Reception is often staffed by a single person on a Saturday, which can be tricky when owners attempt to make last minute appointments.
24 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

It’s part of the job. You have to put on a brave face and put your thoughts and feelings aside, and think about the practice as a whole, and all the staff, and how your reactions are going to impact everybody else. So, you could be adding fuel to the fire and it’s not something you can afford to do.
— Receptionist Kelly Haslop

Practice Manager Bri Smith working reception, which includes being able to fill basic pharmacy prescriptions for things like worming.
6 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Rachel Gill has brought Petey in for a potential eye problem. [TODO: Case Details.]
24 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Turbo, after several days at the practice for a significant spiral fracture to his rear-right femur, is about to be discharged to [TODO: Mum] and her daughter and Turbo's owner, Amber Waters.
17 March, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

Marilena Caputo has been bringing Coco to Brudine since he was a puppy. He seemed nonplussed by all the attention he was being given and was mostly content just sniffing around the practice.
24 February, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

I’ve been seeing that dog [Coco] for years; I remember giving it it’s puppy vaccinations.
— Dr Karen Viggers
Old dogs with little teeth. The ones that come in with their tongue hanging out because they’ve got no teeth left, and they’re just like a real senior citizen; you can imagine their little old man voice if they could talk. And I just love them.
— Receptionist Kelly Haslop

Tiah undergoes her [TODO: second?] course of chemotherapy (Doxorubicin). Tiah was diagnosed weeks before with an aggressive form of lymphoma and, of all the treatment options, Doxorubicin was chosen to return Tiah to the best quality of life as quickly as possible.
23 December, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

We don’t achieve cure/recovery from lymphoma, rather we aim for good quality of life while maximising remission times.
— Dr Fiona Starr
She had a couple of days where she was off her food and she vomited once and that was it. She went from having very little energy and on the third or fourth day she was out being like, ‘Let’s go walking. Where’s my toys? C’mon, let’s play!’ Her quality of life after that first five days was back to being how she’d been six months beforehand.
— Tristyn Lowe (Tiah's Owner)

Tiah's last day.
1 February, 2018.

Closing time - more sweeping, mopping, cleaning by Receptionist Kelly Haslop (right) and Nurse Skye Longley.
13 January, 2018. Brudine Veterinary Hospital. Charnwood, ACT.

 
SO MANY OTHER THINGS WEEKENDS